Friday, April 17, 2009

Deep Tissue, and Soup Day

Yesterday I made soup, and started simmering ideas about Deep Tissue massage. Massage first:

Many people specifically ask for a Deep Tissue massage. But just what does that mean? I was taught, and the usual technical definition, is that DT is focused work in one spot to break up adhesions within and between muscle fibers. However clients usually mean they want an overall massage with really strong pressure.

Spas may offer Deep Tissue on the menu, but I can tell you what they are almost certainly giving is a firm Swedish massage. There is no such thing as a full body Deep Tissue massage- DT is used in one area for a specific reason. It isn't relaxing either. And since the spots where clients want the most pressure are spots that need to relax, causing those spots discomfort is likely to cause them to tighten even more.

Instead of labeling a massage one or the other, my solution is to ask clients what their goals are for the massage and what pain or limitations they feel. I don't ask what massage modality they want. I do invite feedback as the massage proceeds to be sure I'm on track.

At one moment during the massage I may use a technique from Deep Tissue and at another moment a PNF stretch from Sports Massage gets added. Then it may be followed by something I picked up studying Lomi Lomi. It's the result that counts.
More information is on my website:
Positive-Massage.com/deep_tissue.html


OK, now the soup. Here are all the ingredients that I remember:
  • Bean juice- the water that I previously cooked garbanzos in
  • some very finely chopped carrots bits, to dissolve
  • potato
  • yam(probably really a sweet potato)
  • turnip
  • rutabaga
  • parsnip
  • onion
  • green beans
  • tomatoes frozen last summer
  • garlic. Must have garlic
  • zucchini
  • jalapeno and serrano chilies
  • some other things I forgot
  • some other things which are secret
  • energy, in the form of heat
Consumed with greens from the farmers market plus nasturtiums from the balcony, lentils, and a chunk of whole grain bread. That's nutrition!

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